African Liberation Day – 60 years on from the first All-African People’s Conference

African Liberation Day – 60 years on from the first All-African People’s Conference

African Liberation Day – 60 years on from the first All-African People’s Conference

Kwame Nkrumah once said “I am not African because I was born in Africa but because Africa was born in me”.

There is a beauty in how Africans celebrate each other and their continent. The people of this continent celebrate each other’s achievements like no other, whether it be through their politics, sports and arts. In 2018, Africans came together to not just celebrate Senegal in the World Cup, but also by celebrating the Marvel film Black Panther that showed a strong and powerful African nation prospering with advancements in technology, a hopeful sign for what is to come for Africa soon. These are both excellent examples of the love and support Africans have for one another.

More than 60 years have passed since the first meeting of the All-African People’s Conference (AAPC), a congregation that brought national liberation movements, trade unions and mass organisations to the forefront of African politics. The first time without being under the watchful eye of their governments, this gave Africans the opportunity to come together and discuss the issues that plighted them whilst encouraging African liberation and independence throughout the continent, inspiring their fellow Africans for decades.

 

“Each generation must, out of relative obscurity, discover its mission, fulfil it, or betray it”

– Frantz Fanon

 

Despite a stronger unification in Africa, there is still much progress to be made, including having economic freedom, education and liberty. Today is African Liberation Day, a day that is strongly rooted to the AAPC, without it, many countries could possibly still be colonised to this day.

African Liberation Day is a day in which we can reflect and be inspired by the greats such as Mandela, Nkrumah, Sankara, Olympio, Sékou Touré. However, despite the importance to reflect on our inspirational leaders, growth is essential to ensure Africa can prosper in the 21st century. And as for now, African liberation remains to be unfinished business and the African struggle will continue through generations, until victory and full freedom is ours.

 

By Natasha Vignon